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Gas Safety Newsletter - DEC 2017

Think twice before moving gas appliances.

Gas appliances are connected to the gas supply by what is known as a flexible connector. The connector can develop leaks and cause unsafe conditions if stretched too far or bent too frequently.  Connectors should be inspected periodically by a qualified contractor and replaced as needed.

Here’s some important information to keep in mind:

  • Stationary appliances (boilers, furnaces, water heaters) use hard pipe connections.
  • Moveable appliances (ranges, dryers) use flexible pipe connections.
  • There should only be one flexible connector per appliance. Connectors should not exceed 72 inches in length.
  • Never conceal or extend flexible connectors through walls, floors, partitions, ceilings or appliance housings.
  • Have a licensed master plumber install American Gas Association (AGA/CSA)-approved flex pipe connectors.
  • Installation should uphold manufacturer’s standards and appliance demand.
  • Never use uncoated brass connectors.
  • Ask your qualifed contractor to inspect the flexible connector and replace it if needed.
  • When a qualified contrator disconnects appliances, the contractor will remove connectors, and plug and cap the fuel line.
Note: important information on excess flow valve.

Customers may request installation of an excess flow valve (EFV), a safety device that slows the flow of natural gas in the event of a service line break.
An EFV is not required for normal operation of your gas line. In fact, you may already have an EFV installed.

Please note, even if you request installation, certain conditions must exist for installation and there is a charge for this service.

For more information, we encourage you to visit nationalgridus.com/safety, select the pipeline safety link located under the safety tab, and scroll down to the information on EFV. General information on pipeline safety can be found on this page as well.

For more information, we encourage you to visit nationalgridus.com/safety, select the pipeline safety link located under the safety tab, and scroll down to the information on EFV. General information on pipeline safety can be found on this page as well.

Recognize the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is more common in cold weather. Causes include a malfunctioning heating unit, fuel-burning appliance or a blocked chimney.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea and dizziness

Signs an appliance may be producing carbon monoxide:

  • Condensation on walls and windows
  • Sluggish house pets
  • Dying plants
  • Residents feeling tired or suffering from flu-like symptoms

If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning go outside and call 911 immediately.

Use your gas oven safely this season.

Take these precautions while using a gas oven:

  • Operate ovens as intended.  Never use an oven to heat a room.
  • Keep young children away from the oven while in use.
  • Never cover slots, holes or passages in the oven bottom, as well as oven racks, with aluminum foil. Doing so blocks air flow and may cause carbon monoxide buildup.
  • Use aluminum foil liners with caution because they could trap heat and cause a fire hazard. If a recipe calls for foil, keep it at least 1½ inches from oven walls.
  • Use your senses. Presence of soot on any part of the oven surface could indicate carbon monoxide generation.
  • If you suspect carbon monoxide, move to a safe area and call 911 immediately.
Keep meters and vents clear of snow and ice.

Ice and snow buildup around the fresh air and gas appliance exhaust vents may result in equipment malfunction and could create harmful
carbon monoxide buildup. Icicles on overhangs near the meter can fall and damage the meter and pipes. Be sure to carefully remove them, and any snowbanks, regularly.